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Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)

DURABLE PARTS WITH REAL THERMOPLASTIC

“FDM


Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) Technology uses standard, engineering-grade and high-performance thermoplastics to build concept models, functional prototypes, and end-use parts — the only professional 3D printing technology utilizing production-grade thermoplastics. Parts created using FDM Technology are unmatched in mechanical, thermal, and chemical strength.

The History

Scott Crump, inventor and founder of Stratasys, created FDM Technology more than 20 years ago and is highly regarded as a leader in the 3D printing revolution. Stratasys continues to develop a wide selection of systems that meet the needs and exceed expectations of designers, engineers, educators, manufacturers and other innovative professionals alike around the world. 

How it Works

3D printers powered by FDM Technology build parts layer-by-layer. A thermoplastic material is heated to a semi-liquid state and extruded to specification through computer-controlled paths. The system utilizes two material types per build cycle: material specified by the designer and a support material that fills cavities and undercuts. Material filaments are supplied to the print head from the 3D printer’s material bays. The head operates in X and Y coordinates as it deposits material in single layers. When the layer is completed, the tray lowers in the Z axis and the next layer begins. When the 3D printer has completed a build, the user can breakaway the support material or dissolve it of in detergent and water  —  then part is ready for use.

Benefits

Known as office-friendly, FDM Technology makes the printing process clean and easy-to-use. Thermoplastic-based designs can withstand exposure to high temperatures, chemicals, humidity, extreme dryness, and stressful mechanical environments. Complex geometries and cavities are possible using soluble support materials — shapes and details once considered too difficult to build when only traditional manufacturing methods were available. To inquire about our Seattle and Oakland 3D printing, contact us.

FDM MATERIAL COMPARISON CHART

FDM MATERIALS LAYER THICKNESS SUPPORT STRUCTURE COLORS TENSILE STRENGTH ELONGATION AT STRENGTH FLEXURAL STRESS IZOD NOTCHED IMPACT HEAT DEFLECTION
ABSplus-P430 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
Soluble Ivory, White, Black, Dark Gray, Red, Blue, Olive Green, Nectarine 37 MPa 3.0% 53 MPa 106 J/m 96°C
ABSi 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
0.005 in
Soluble Translucent, Translucent Ambler / Red 37 MPa 4.4% 62 MPa 96 J/m 87°C
ABS-M30 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
0.005 in
Soluble Natural, White, Black, Dark Grey, Red, Blue 36 MPa 4.0% 61 MPa 139 J/m 96°C
ABS-M30i 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
0.005 in
Soluble Ivory 36 MPa 4% 61 MPa 139 J/m 96°C
ABS-EDS7 0.010 in
0.007 in
Soluble Black 36 MPa 3% 61 MPa 111 J/m 96°C
ASA 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
0.005 in
Soluble Ivory 29 MPa 9% 60 MPa 64 J/m 98°C
NYLON 12 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
Soluble Black 48 MPa 30% 69 MPa 200 J/m 82°C
PC 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
Soluble / Breakable White 68 MPa 4.8% 104 MPa 53 J/m 138°C
PC-ABS 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
Soluble Black 41 MPa 6.0% 68 MPa 196 J/m 110°C
PC-ISO 0.013 in
0.010 in
0.007 in
Breakaway White, Translucent, Natural 57 MPa 4.3% 90 MPa 86 J/m 133°C
PPSF PPSU 0.013 in
0.010 in
Breakaway Tan 55 MPa 3% 110 MPa 58.73 J/m 189°C
ULTEM-9085 0.013 in
0.010 in
Breakaway Black, Tan 71.64 MPa 5.9% 115.1 MPa 106 J/m 153°C

Get the FATHOM Materials Comparison Chart