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Change Is Additive—Week of 10/7/16

CHANGE IS ADDITIVE—A 3D Printing News Series by FATHOM

Acoustic Holograms, 3D Printing Customized Materials for Robotics, Lightweighting for Aerospace, Additive Manufacturing at Large Scale

With so many weekly developments in a fast-changing industry like additive manufacturing, the headlines can really stack up. To cut through the clutter of 3D printing news, check out these staff picks of the week. What do you think is the most impactful development?


Acoustic Holograms Created with 3D Printing

Researchers are creating complex patterns in air and water by harnessing and shaping ultrasonic waves. By 3D printing plates with specific patterns and placing them in front of speakers, the team can levitate water droplets and control the movement of small objects. According to the researchers, “The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound” // Read More // Watch Video

MIT Researchers 3D Printing Customizable Robot Padding

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) are creating customizable shock-absorbent padding primarily for use in cushioning and covering valuable robotic systems. The team’s “Programmable Viscoelastic Material” (PVM) technique allows users to digitally manipulate the materials going into every 3D printed part, allowing for complex properties within a single part. “We can make really effective dampers and those dampers can be tailored exactly to the application by controlling the amount of liquid and solid,” said researcher Robert MacCurdy // Read More // Watch Video

read_subhead_940x1153D Printing with RoboticsStunning Installation Created with Direct Digital Manufacturing

Installed for the GPU Technology Conference in Amsterdam, The Daedalus Pavilion is a demonstration of the scope and potential of large-scale 3D printing for construction. The project is the result of a collaboration between Arup, an engineering consultancy firm, and AI Build, a UK-based AI and 3D printing startup. Measuring approximately 20 feet in each dimension, the installation was entirely 3D printed over the course of three weeks using industrial robots from Kuka // Read More

Elon Musk 3D PrintingIntegrating 3D Printing into Manufacturing Process is Helping SpaceX Lightweight Rockets for Space Travel

Lightweighting through 3D printing is at the core of Elon Musk’s ambitious plan to colonize Mars. SpaceX, Musk’s aerospace and space transport company, has used 3D printing frequently before, including in the manufacture of its “Draco” engines. According to Musk, 3D printing allows SpaceX to significantly reduce the cost of fabrication. Integrated cooling channels in the walls of the rocket engine chamber can be created using 3D printing, a process that would be “a real pain” using traditional methods // Read More

download_subhead_940x1153D Printing SphereCustomizable Stereographic Projection

Stereographic projection is a controlled light-based shape projection that uses a sphere to create a two dimensional projected image. FATHOM’s Design team created our customized sphere with a projection of the FATHOM logo, and you can make virtually any custom shape for projection. Check it out! // Download



What is FATHOM working on in the day-to-day? Follow our social media pages to keep up with our latest projects // Facebook // Twitter // LinkedIn // Instagram // YouTube

To start a conversation about a project or discuss a quote for 3D printing, CNC machining, urethane casting, rapid tooling, injection molding, or R&D contract services, send us a request for quote. FATHOM is also an authorized partner of Stratasys. Get a quote for a professional 3D printer today!

Imagery and News Sources: 3ders.org, 3Dprint.com, 3Dprintingindustry.com, Nature.com, MIT, Quartz, Forbes, Northwestern University, Thingiverse, SpaceX 
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